Prof. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies at The Citadel. He is the former Executive Director of Quilliam International, the world's oldest counter extremism think tank. He is an expert on violent extremism issues both domestically and overseas. Prior to his current role, he served as a Senior Program Officer at the U.S. Institute of Peace where he leads their Horn of Africa Programs and served as an expert on Preventing/Countering Violent Extremism (P/CVE) issues at the institute. Prof. Fraser-Rahim's areas of specialty are on transnational terrorist movements, Counterterrorism/P/CVE, Islamic intellectual history, Islam in America, contemporary theology in the Muslim world and African Affairs.  
 
In addition, Prof. Fraser-Rahim worked for the United States Government for more than a decade for the Department of Homeland Security, Director of National Intelligence and the National Counterterrorism Center providing strategic advice and executive branch analytical support on countering violent extremism issues to the White House and the National Security Council where he was the author or co-author  of Presidential Daily Briefs and strategic assessments on extremist ideology and counter-radicalization. Prof. Fraser-Rahim has conducted research in more than 40 countries on the African continent, and has worked and studied throughout the Middle East. He completed advanced level Arabic language certificates at various higher education institutions in the US, West Africa and the Middle East.
 
He is the author of numerous policy reports, Op-Eds, and several upcoming new journal articles and is sought after and has been featured on MSNBC, CNN, Al Arabiyya,  Al Jazeera, Fox News, BBC, France 24, NPR to name a few.  He completed his Ph.D. at Howard University in African Studies with a focus on Islamic Thought, Spirituality and Modernity issues. He is the author of the award winning book, America’s Other Muslims, Rowman and Littlefield (2020). Finally, he is also a Security Fellow at the Truman National Security Project.

At Jackson, he is one of the undergraduate Capstone Course instructors for the 2021-2022 academic year.

 


Courses Taught

Capstone